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Full text of "Summer term of the Western State Normal School"

WESTERN 
NORMAL 
SCHOOL 
BULLETIN 

SUMMER 
TERM 

June 26th 10 August 4th 
1911 

Vol. VI No. 4 

PUBLISHED QUARTERLY- BY 
THE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Entered at Ptostofike at fCahmatoe 
as Second Class Matter 



The person charging this material is re- 
sponsible for its return to the library from 
which it was withdrawn on or before the 
Latest Date stamped below. 

Theft, mutilation, and underlining of books are reasons 
for disciplinary action and may result in dismissal from 
the University. 
To renew call Telephone Center, 333-8400 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS LIBRARY AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN 



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NOV 2 



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L161— O-1096 



SUMMER TERM 



OF THE 



Western 
State Normal School 

KALAMAZOO, MICH. 



Monday, June 26th to 
Friday, August 4th, 1911 



Faculty of the Summer Term. 

D. B. WALDO, A. M., President. 
CLARA ALLISON, A. B., Hastings High School, 

Latin. 
HELEN BALCH, 

Construction. 
EDITH C. BARNUM, 

First Grade, Training School. 
*ESTHER BRALEY A. B., 

Librarian. 
DORA 1. BUCKINGHAM, 

Assistant in Kindergarten. 
ERNEST BURNHAM, A. M. 

Director of Rural School Department. 
C. H. CARRICK A. B., Superintendent of Schools, Charlotte, 

Geography. 

MARIE COLE, 

Clerk, Training School. 
W. E. CONKLING, Superintendent of Schools, Dowagiac, 

Civics. 
*MILDRED DAVIS, 

Physical Training. 
IDA M. DENSMORE, 

Director of Training School. 
MARY ENSFIELD, 

Rural School Methods. 
JOHN B. FAUGHT, Ph. D., 

Mathematics. 
JOHN E. FOX, A. B., 

Physics and Chemistry. 
ANNA L. FRENCH, 

Assistant Librarian. 
LUCY GAGE, 

Director of Kindergarten. 
EMELIA GOLDSWORTHY, 

Public School Art 



4 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

*BESSIE B. GOODRICH, 

Third Grade, Training School. 

*LUCIA HARRISON, A. B., 

Sixth Grade, Training School. 
L. H. HARVEY, Ph. D., 

Biology. 
T. PAUL HICKEY, A. B., 

History. 
ALBA HILL, Supervisor of Manual Training, Rock Island, 111. 

Manual Training. 
BEULAH HOOTMAN, 

Public School Music. 
FRED S. HUFF, Kalamazoo Public Schools, 

Manual Training. 
V. R. HUNGERFORD, A. B., Commissioner of Schools, Van 
Buren county, 

History. 
GEORGE F. JILLSON, A. B., 

Mathematics. 
ADELE M. JONES, B. S., 

Domestic Art. 
*BERTRAND L. JONES, A. B., 

English Language and Literature. 
MATIE LEE JONES, 

Physical Training. 
CHRISTINE M. KECK, Principal of Sigsbee School, Grand 
Rapids, 

English. 
CATHERINE KOCH, B. S., 

Nature Study and Agriculture. 
*FRANK A. MANNY, A. M. 

Education. 
*ALICE L MARSH, B. S., 

English. 
FLORENCE MARSH, 

Public School Music. 
♦WILLTAM McCRACKEN, Ph. D., 

Chemistry. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



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SUMMER BULLETIN 5 

♦NELLIE M'CONNELL, 

Second Grade, Training School. 

BRUCE MILLIKEN, A. B., Principal of High School, Wal- 
lace, Idaho, 

Education. 

*KATHERINE MULRY, 

Fourth Grade, Training School. 

KATHERINE NEWTON, 
Secretary. 

G. N. OTWELL, Commissioner of Schools, Berrien County, 
Arithmetic. 

♦MAUDE PARSONS, A. B., 

Latin. 
JOHN PHELAN, A. B., 

Rural School Department. 
FLORENCE PRAY, B. S., 

Domestic Science. 
ROBERT M. REINHOLD, B. Pd., 

Education. 
G. EDITH SEEKELL, 

Fourth Grade, Training School. 
LENORE SHANWISE, A. B., 

Expression. 
KATHERINE SHEAN, 

Assistant Secretary. 
WILLIAM H. SPAULDING, A. B., 

Director of Athletics. 
LAVINA SPINDLER, 

Sixth Grade, Training School. 
GEORGE SPRAU, A. M, 

English, Language and Literature. 
PETER TAZELAAR, 

Assistant in Manual Training. 
♦EMELIE TOWNSEND, B. S., 

Seventh Grade, Training School. 
GEORGE S. WAITE, 

Manual Training. 



6 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

CAROLINE WAKEMAN, Ph., B., 

History. 
EVA WARRINER, Director County Normal, Marshall, 

Grammar. 
L. H. WOOD, A. M., 

Geography. 
E. N. WORTH, A. B., Principal of Kalamazoo High School, 

Chemistry and Physics. 
ELISABETH ZIMMERMAN, A. B., 

German. p 



Absent on leave. 



Summer Term of the Western 
State Normal School. 

THE eighth annual summer term of the Western State Nor- 
mal School will open June 26 and continue six weeks, 
closing August 4. Students will be enrolled and classi- 
fied on Monday, June 26, and classes in all departments will be- 
gin recitations on Tuesday, June 27. Nearly all of the regular 
instructors of the Normal School will remain in residence dur- 
ing the Summer term, and will be assisted by a number of out- 
side teachers, selected for their efficiency in special lines of work. 

LOCATION 

The Western State Normal School is located at Kalamazoo 
the County Seat of Kalamazoo County, in the heart of South- 
western Michigan. In beauty, in accessibility, in general educa- 
tional advantages, this thriving city of forty thousand in- 
habitants affords an ideal location for the school. 

Kalamazoo is at the intersection of the great lines of travel 
in Western Michigan. It is the half-way point between Detroit 
and Chicago on the main line of the Michigan Central Railway, 
which is here crossed by the Grand Rapids and Indiana, the 
Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, and the Chicago, Kalama- 
zoo and Saginaw railroads, all running north and south. It is 
the eastern terminus of the South Haven branch of the Michi- 
gan Central which gives excellent connections with Chicago by 
boat. It is also the eastern terminus of the Kalamazoo, Lake 
Shore and Chicago Railroad. The electric lines of the Michigan 
United Railways Company give trolley connections with the 
eastern part of the State via Battle Creek and Jackson. On the 
various steam railways more than fifty trains arrive and depart 
daily, giving excellent connections with the surrounding territory. 

The advantages of Kalamazoo as a place of residence are 
unquestioned. The city is beautiful in situation, and is well kept. 
The climate is healthful, the water supply excellent, and the 
sanitary conditions are unusually good. Situated in the center 
of a fine farming country, it is itself widely known for its diver- 
sified industries. 



* WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

PURPOSE OF THE SCHOOL 

The object of the school as constituted by law is to prepare 
teachers for public school service. The work of the school is or- 
ganized and conducted essentially to this end. It is recognized 
that scholarship, knowledge of child nature, and a proper atti- 
tude toward the work of teaching are the three essential factors 
in all professional preparation for teachers. The course of study 
in the Western State Normal School has been planned with 
the purpose of providing for these ends by giving as thorough 
knowledge of the subject matter as possible in the time devoted 
to the work by emphasizing the principles underlying the educ- 
ational process, and by keeping before the mind of the student 
the realization that the highest aim of education is character. 
All facilities possible will be offered for the furtherance of these 
purposes and for bringing the student into contact with the best 
in modern thought and life. The spirit of hearty cooperation be- 
tween faculty and students in enterprises and interests of the 
school will be fostered at all times. 

The responsibility for the proper attitude of students toward 
the school and community is necessarily for the most part 
thrown upon the students themselves. While it is the purpose of 
the school to continually incite the student to higher and better 
ideals of character and public service, it is impracticable for a 
Normal School to attempt the task of reforming young men and 
young women. No personal effort will be spared in assisting 
students in every possible way. But those who are manifestly 
lacking in the essentials of good character, or in ability to be- 
come efficient instructors of children, will be requested, when- 
ever the evidence of their unfitness is complete, to withdraw 
from the school. 

During the summer term special attention will be given to 
those who are already teaching. Courses of study, plans of 
work, methods of instruction, will be shaped to the needs of 
teachers now engaged in the profession. 

BUILDINGS 

The classes of the regular certificate courses will meet as 
heretofore in the Normal building. This structure contains, in 
addition to the administration offices, fourteen class-rooms, an 
Miemblj room and laboratory facilities for work in biological 
and physical sciences. The site occupied by the building is al- 



SUMMER BULLETIN 9 

ready well known for the panoramic view afforded of Kalama- 
zoo City and the Kalamazoo River Valley. 

Review classes will meet in the training building. The train- 
ing building is a splendid structure with two stories and a base- 
ment, 118 feet long and ioo feet wide. This structure is regarded 
as one of the best planned of its kind in the entire country. In 
completeness and convenience the building is a model. 

All shop work in the department of Manual Training will 
be conducted as heretofore in the Manual Training Building of 
the Kalamazoo public schools. 

The gymnasium is the largest of its kind to be found among 
the normal schools and colleges of the Northwest Territory. 
The main room is 119 feet long and 68 feet wide, the floor be- 
ing entirely clear of posts or obstructions of any kind. The run- 
ning track, 12 feet above the main floor, is suspended from the 
structural steel supporting the roof. The track is 9 1-2 feet in 
width, and has sloping sides and ends as well as raised corners. 
In the basement are shower baths for both men and women, and 
a swimming pool 52 feet long. All classes in public school gym- 
nastics will meet in the gymnasium. 

EQUIPMENT 

The Library has developed rapidly during the past year, and 
by the opening, of the summer term will number about 8,000 
volumes; as the Library has been built up from the beginning 
in the last six years, it has been possible to make a good work- 
ing selection from the latest as well as the standard authorities 
in the various subjects. Books are constantly being purchased, 
and all students of the Normal School are permitted to use the 
Kalamazoo City Library, which numbers 40,000 volumes. 

In the department of physics and chemistry additions of ap- 
paratus have been made during the year and the facilities for 
effective work in biology have been increased. The working 
equipment in the department of geography has also been en- 
larged. 

Extensive additions of stereopticon slides have been made 
for the departments of biology and geography. New machinery 
has been added to the manual training equipment, and the de- 
partments of domestic art and domestic science have been 
strengthened. 



io WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

THE RAILROAD 

Students having recitations at the Normal building will be 
afforded free transportation on the two track railway belonging 
to the Normal School. Two cars will be in operation daily dur- 
ing the entire summer, thus removing all objections on the part 
of those who find hill climbing irksome. 

FEES AND LIVING EXPENSES 

No tuition fee will be collected from students who are en- 
rolled in the Rural School department. 

Students and teachers in the Graded School Course, Life 
Certificate Course, and in all special courses, will pay a fee of 
three dollars for the term. This fee admits to all classes. No 
charge is made for the special lecture courses offered during the 
summer term. A fee of fifty cents is collected for the support 
of outdoor athletics. 

Board in clubs costs about $3.00 per week, and rooms con- 
veniently located and suitably furnished may be obtained at a 
cost ranging in price from 50 cents to $1.00 per week for each 
student. The total expense for the summer term should not ex- 
ceed $30.00. 

CREDIT 

Credits applying on the certificate courses may be earned 
in any of the subjects regularly required. Twenty four weeks 
(one-half of a full terms credit) is usually the maximum credit 
for any student during the summer term. Classes reciting daily 
ordinarily can earn six weeks' credit, while those reciting twice 
each day may earn twelve weeks' credit. Review classes are not 
credited on the certificate courses except in the Rural School 
department. 

DEMAND FOR TEACHERS 

There is an increasing demand for trained teachers through- 
out the state and in the country at large. The trend of salaries 

Avard, and teaching is nearer a profession than ever before. 
Graduates of the Western Normal are in great demand and 
much care is exercised in placing students of the school where 
the likelihood of success and the opportunity to serve are greatest. 

The city of Kalamazoo affords many opportunities for re- 
munerative employment both for young men and young women. 
Students desiring work with a view to lessening the expense of 



SUMMER BULLETIN n 

attending school are assisted in securing employment of various 
kinds. 

• ATHLETICS AND SOCIAL FEATURES 

Due attention will be given to various forms of athletics dur- 
ing the summer term. Baseball will be under the direction of the 
regular athletic director of the school, and games will be sched- 
uled with teams in the city league during the summer term. Ten- 
nis will be a prominent feature of athletics for men and women 
during the summer. Five tennis courts will be at the disposal of 
students, and attention will also be given to other outdoor 
games and sports that may be used in public schools. 

As in former years, a social committee, selected from the 
faculty, will provide special features of entertainment with a 
view to securing a variety of interests and affording opportu- 
nities for extending acquaintanceship among the students. 

Social gatherings similar to those of last summer, which will 
be so pleasantly remembered by all students who were in attend- 
ance, will be included in the general program which has been 
planned for the enjoyment of members of the summer school. 

GENERAL STUDENT PARTIES 

Friday evening, June 30, 8 P. M. Reception to students. 
Tuesday afternoon, July 4, 3 P. M. School party. 
Thursday evening, July 13, 8 P. M. School party. 
Friday evening, July 21, 8 P. M. School party. 

COURSES OFFERED. 

The work offered in the summer term is as follows: 

1. Regular Certificate Courses. 

2. Review Courses. 

3. Life Certificate Extension Course. 

4. Lectures. 

REGULAR CERTIFICATE COURSES 

A large number of classes will be formed in the branches in- 
cluded in the regular certificate courses. Several of these classes 
in the Life Certificate and Graded Certificate groups will meet 
twice daily, thus enabling a student to cover the work of two 
twelve-weeks studies during the summer term. Classes will be 
formed in a wide variety of subjects in the departments of Psy- 
chology and Education, English Language and Literature, Ex- 
pression, Geography, Science, Mathematics, History and Civics, 



12 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

German and Latin, Drawing, Music, Manual Training, Domestic 
Economy, Kindergarten Theory, Library Methods, and Physical 
Training. 

REVIEW COURSES 

Review classes will be formed in all of the common school 
branches. These classes will be of special benefit to students 
and teachers who are preparing for the county examinations to 
be held in August. Oportunity will be offered for reviewing sub- 
jects included in the first, second, and third grade examinations. 
There will be no summer schools or institutes this year in the 
counties near Kalamazoo, and all teachers are urged to take 
advantage of the unusual privileges offered at the Western 
State Normal. Credits earned during the six week's term are 
recorded, and in some subjects apply on certificate courses. 
There will be thorough reviews, and in addition courses will be 
so arranged in many subjects that students attending two or 
more summer terms may pursue work in a given study without 
duplicating subject matter. 

The subjects in which review courses will be offered are 
Physiology, United States History, Civil Government, Grammar, 
Arithmetic, Geography, Reading, Orthography, Theory and 
Art of Teaching, School Law, Course of Study, Algebra, Bota- 
ny, General History, Physics, and Geometry. 

LIFE CERTIFICATE AND EXTENSION COURSE 

In 1905 the State Board authorized the granting of an ex- 
tension life certificate to mature students who (1) are high 
school graduates, (2) have taught six years, and (3) under the 
direction of the Western State Normal School faculty have com- 
pleted work as follows: (a) three summer terms in residence, 
(b) two years of non-resident work. This non-resident work is 
either (1) class work at some center within range of the school 
so that an instructor can meet the students once a week, usually 
on Saturdays, or (2) carefully organized courses taken by cor- 
respondence. 

The Western State Normal School, from its foundation, has 
permitted properly qualified students to avail themselves of this 
opportunity. During the past five years, forty-nine students 
have completed this course. 







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SUMMER BULLETIN 13 

The object of this arrangement has been to meet the needs 
of those who are otherwise deprived of opportunities for 
growth and advancement. The danger that in some cases has 
been anticipated that students by taking this course would be 
led aside from undertaking resident study, has not proved real. 
In fact, one of the important results has been the number of 
students who, after undertaking the extension course, have come 
to see that it was more possible than they had thought to enter 
upon and complete the life certificate course in residence. 

A higher grade of work is necessary to satisfy the require- 
ments than the average of class residence accomplishment. It is 
the student whose experience has trained him to effective meth- 
ods of organization who can profit most by studyirg under the 
direction of an absent instructor. 

A special announcement of this department has oeen print- 
ed, which will be furnished on application to the Secretary. 

LECTURES 

As heretofore, the Normal will offer unusual privileges this 
summer in the way of lecture courses by distinguished educa- 
tors. One prominent lecturer will be at the school during each 
week of the term, and the discussion will be along the lines 
that are of interest to progressive teachers. 

It has been decided to limit the number of lecture days 
each week, thereby leaving three or four afternoons open to 
field work and recreation including tennis and baseball. Hours 
have been careful^ arranged for the lecture courses so as to 
avoid conflict with classes and other important features of the 
summer school. 

Thursday, Professor Edward J. Ward of the University of 
June 29 Wisconsin will give an illustrated lecture on "So- 

cial Center Development." Mr. Ward was for 
some years connected with Social Center work in Rochester, 
New York. His work in that city is well known. Under his di- 
rection the schoolhouse became the realty live social center of 
its neighborhood. Later he was appointed as lecturer and exe- 
cutive officer in the National Municipal League, and in the fall 
of 1910 was engaged by the University of Wisconsin as Ad- 
viser in the Department of Civic and Social Center Develop- 
ment. 



i 4 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Wednesday, Hon. Lawton T. Hemans of Mason, a well known 
July 5 writer on topics in Michigan history will de- 

liver a lecture on Stevens T. Mason, the first 
Governor of Michigan. Mr. Hemans is now engaged in writing 
the life of Governor Mason and has made most careful re- 
search, including the study of all available original material 
bearing upon the character and work of Michigan's boy Gover- 
nor. Mr. Hemans is one of Michigan's most forceful and inspir- 
ing public speakers. 

Monday, Dr. R. M. Wenley of the University of Michigan will 
July 10 give two addresses on the general subject "Educa- 

tion in Another Democracy" (Scotland). His 
specific subjects are (i) "Early Organization and Success" and 
(2) "The Disintegration and Later Fortunes". Dr. Wenley is 
widely known as the head of the department of philosophy at 
the University of Michigan. His reputation as a brilliant think- 
er, writer and speaker is international. 

Wednesday, Professor M. V. O'Shea of the University of Wis- 
July 19 consin, will deliver two lectures at eleven in 

the morning and at four in the afternoon. The 
subjects will be (1) "Hidden Forces in Life and Education" and 
(2) "The Trend of the Teens". Professor O'Shea is the well 
known author of "Education as Adjustment", "Social Develop- 
ment and Education" and other well known text books in educa- 
tion. He is an enthusiastic student in the field of education and 
is a splendid platform speaker. 

Tuesday, "Abraham Lincoln" an address by Hon. Addison G. 
July 25 Procter of St. Joseph, Michigan. Mr. Procter was 

member of the famous Wigwam Convention in 
Chicago that nominated Lincoln in i860. He has made a careful 
study of the life of Lincoln and is a splendid platform speaker. 
His address will be a rare treat for the students of the summer 
school. 

Thursday, Professor J. J. Findlay, head of the department of 
August 3 education at the University of Manchester, Eng- 

land, will lecture upon an educational subject. 
Dr. Findlay has been one of the chief agents in bringing Ger- 
man and American influences into English education. In con- 
nection with the department at Manchester he has established a 
Demonstration School which is one of the most distinctively 
experimental schools now in existence. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 15 

Details of Departments. 

Courses bearing numbers from i to 99 offered in the Re- 
view, High School, and Rural Departments; those from 101 to 
199 receive credit in the Graded School and Life Certificate 
Courses. 

Courses in the High School and Rural School Departments 
which are the same as the courses in the Graded School and 
Life Certificate work, are given the numbers of the latter. 

ART 

GRADED AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Nature Study and Expression. This course aims to 
enlarge the appreciation and knowledge of the world of nature 
by expressing various phases of the landscape, also by study 
and expression of flowers, grasses, fruits, and other nature 
subjects, and in various mediums, including pencil, crayon, and 
water-color. The nature motifs studied form the bases for 
problems in design which are applied to practical school prob- 
lems. 12 weeks credit. MISS BALCH. 

102. Perspective. It is desirable that Art 101 should pre- 
cede Art 102. This course aims to enlarge the appreciation and 
understanding of the common forms around us, and to develop 
a knowledge and skill in rendering the appearance of forms in- 
cluded under the study of cylindrical and rectangular per- 
spective. 12 weeks credit. MISS GOLDSWORTHY. 

103. Construction. This course takes up the subject of 
hand work in the grades, and includes the working out of sim- 
ple problems in weaving, basketry, clay modeling, stenciling, 
and bookbinding. This course may be taken without previous 
courses in Art. 6 weeks credit. MISS BALCH. 

Students who desire advanced work in applied design in 
metal and leather work may take private lessons with a special 
teacher. 

In planning a course in art, it is well to have Art 101. pre- 
cede Art 102. Art 103 (Construction work) may be taken with- 
out previous art training. 

BIOLOGY 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

7. Physiology. An elementary review course for teachers 
preparing for the fall examinations. While the functions of the 



16 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

various systems of the body will be especially emphasized, yet 
enough anatomy will be given to furnish an understanding of 
the various organs. Bring all available texts, lectures, and 
reference works. DR. HARVEY. 

8. Botany. A review course designed to prepare teachers 
for the fall examinations. Bergen's Elements of Botany will 
form the basis of this course. Bring all texts available. Four 
periods a week. DR. HARVEY. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

in. Nature Study. The place of Nature Study in the cur- 
ricula of the elementary and rural school is definitely assured. 
Most teachers feel a lack of preparation not only in regard to 
subject matter, but in methods of presentation. It is the pro- 
nounced object of the course to bring the student into touch 
with a large number of plant and animal forms, to consider 
methods of presentation, and to gain acquaintance with the lit- 
erature. The course consists of field excursions, library work, 
and occasional laboratory exercises and conferences. Kalama- 
zoo offers in its diverse habitats many localities of unusual in- 
terest, making an ideal center for Nature Study work. Students 
should bring clothing suitable for tramping, collecting cases, 
hand lenses, etc. Two afternoons of each week will be devoted 
to the work. Substitutes for Physics 102 in meeting require- 
ments. 6 weeks credit. DR. HARVEY. 

MISS KOCH. 

CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS. 
CHEMISTRY 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

1, 2, 3. General Inorganic Chemistry. This course will 
be devoted to a study of the metals or non-metals, according to 
the needs of those taking the course. Laboratory work is re- 
quired. 12 weeks credit. MR. WORTH. 

4. Review Chemistry. This course is intended for those 
desiring a review of the subject. Especial attention will be de- 
voted to the modern developments of the science and to its 
commercial applications. Once daily. No credit. MR. WORTH. 

PHYSICS 

Elementary Physics. A choice of Courses 1, 2 or 3 will 
be given depending upon which is in greatest demand. Course 



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SUMMER BULLETIN 17 

1 comprises Mechanics of solids and liquids; Course 2, Mag* 
netism and Electricity, and Course 3, Sound and Light. 

While this is a beginner's Course it is intended for students 
who are not enrolled during the regular school year. Labora- 
tory work will be required, 12 weeks credit in High School 
Department. MR. FOX. 

4. Review Physics. Class meets twice daily. Review of 
entire subject of elementary physics. Especial attention given to 
methods of presentation of the subject, class room demonstra- 
tions and the application of the principles of algebra to the so- 
lution of problems. This course is especially designed for those 
wishing to teach the subject in the high school. No credit. 

MR. FOX. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. See course 1 above. 

104 Qualitative Analysis. A course will be arranged to 
meet the needs of those who desire work of this kind. 6 to 13 
weeks credit according to the amount of time spent in the 
laboratory. MR. WORTH. 

DOMESTIC ART. 

107. Plain Sewing. A combination of machine and hand 
work in the making of a four-piece suit of underwear. Discus- 
sions on pattern making, materials, and various methods of fin- 
ishing and trimming. 6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

108. Dressmaking. This course aims to give the student 
a practical knowledge of drafting, designing, making, fitting 
and finishing tailored shirt waist suits and simple summer dres- 
ses. Each student will make a shirt waist and tailored skirt of a 
suitable cotton or linen material, and a simple muslin dress. 
6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

109.' Millinery. This course is offered to meet the needs 
of the home milliner. Practical lessons will be given in the de- 
signing, making ,and trimming of hats, suitable for summer 
and winter. Special attention will be given to bow making and 
other hand-made trimmings, and to the cleaning and renovating 
of old millinery materials. 6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

no. Art Needlework. The object of this course is to ac- 
quaint the student with various kinds of embroidery and artistic 
needlework. The work will include applique, hemstitching, sim- 
ple drawn work, feather stitching, Bermuda fagoting, fancy 



18 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

darning, scalloped edges, dots, eyelets, and French embroidery, 
applied to household linens, pillows, table runners, and articles 
of clothing. 6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

Note. — The student will be expected to furnish all materials. 
Courses 109 and no are only offered providing there is a suf- 
ficient number of students enrolled. 

DOMESTIC SCIENCE 

107. This course offers practical work in the cooking of 
all classes of foods, such as cereals, vegetables, meat, eggs, 
bread, pastry, salads and dessert. 

The work is planned to meet the needs of those outside of 
the Domestic Science department who desire practical work in 
cooking. 6 weeks credit will be given but will not apply on the 
two year course in Domestic Science. MISS PRAY. 

108. This course includes the planning, cooking and serv- 
ing of meals at various costs. It is desired that those enter- 
ing this class should have had some work in cooking. A credit 
of 6 weeks will be given but it will not apply on the two year 
course in Domestic Science. MISS PRAY. 

EDUCATION 

GRADED SCHOOL, AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Introduction to the Study of Education. While the 
greater part of the time of this course will be given to gaining 
facility in dealing with the problems of elementary psychology 
and in the use of the necessary vocabulary and materials, it is 
intended also to lay the foundation for the student's 
later work in education and especially to assist him to a better 
understanding and control of his own methods of study. Re- 
quired in Graded School and all Life Certificate Courses. 
12 weeks credit. MR. MILLIKEN. 

102. The Study of Children. By means of definite assign- 
ments for observation and the careful study of children, the stu- 
dent will have opportunity to gain further acquaintance with 
the interests and activities of the various stages of child life and 
youth. This will be supplemented by the reading of some of the 
more significant studies that have been made and by acquaint- 
ance with the more important conclusions and problems that 
have been formulated. Required in Graded School and General 
Life Certificate Courses. Prerequisite, Course 101. 6 weeks 
credit MR. REINHOLD. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 19 

106. History of Modern Education. The development of 
the school in its relation to other social organizations. Especial 
attention will be given to the historical conditions and the men 
most significant in the understanding of present-day problems. 
Required in all Life Certificate Courses. Prerequisite, 102, 103, 
104, or 105. MR. RLINHOLD. 

107. Psychology. It is intended that students shall have 
an opportunity in this course to restate the material gained else- 
where and with the aid of Angell and other texts and by means 
of careful experimentation to formulate the subject sufficiently 
that it may be serviceable in their teaching and constitute a 
basis for independent ~.udy. Required in all Life Certificate 
Courses. Prerequisite, 106. 12 weeks credit. MR. MILLIKEN. 

108. School Organization and Administration. This course 
is intended primarily for those students who are or intend to be 
superintendents or principals of schools. It will be of value, 
however, to other teachers who wish to understand better the 
conditions of efficiency in school relationships. A study will be 
made of some of the books and periodical literature of the sub- 
ject in an effort to determine influences which are manifest- 
ing themselves in school supervision, curricula, organizations, 
etc. Eelective. Credit arranged with instructor. 

MR. REINHOLD. 

ENGLISH 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

7. Preparatory Grammar. The purpose of this course is a 
thorough review for those who are making preparation for the 
county examinations. It is not accepted as credit for the course 
in Grammar. The topics announced for the August examination 
will be emphasized. MISS WARRINER. 

99. Preparatory Composition. The elements of composi- 
tion are treated under both form and content. The course deals 
with punctuation, word usage, paragraph and sentence struc- 
ture, and business and social forms in letter writing. Daily prac- 
tice is afforded in both oral and written composition. 12 weeks 
credit. MISS WARRINER. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. English Composition. The aim of this course is to 
help the student to think systematically and to express his 
thought in plain English prose. Much time is given to analysis 



20 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

of good prose style and to writing expositions of one para- 
graph and of several paragraphs. Some time is devoted to the 
study of description and narration as forms of discourse. Sen- 
tence structure, punctuation, and diction are carefully studied, 
and emphasized in class and individual criticism. The written 
work is supplemented by lectures on the theory of composi- 
tion by the instructor and members of the class. 12 weeks 
credit. MR. SPRAU. 

102. English Literature. Half of the time is given to the 
study of the history of English literature in the form of lectures, 
supplementary reading, outlines, and reports. The other half 
is devoted to reading and interpreting masterpieces selected 
from the various periods of English literature. Each student is 
expected to have read or to read during the term a reasonable 
amount of representative English literature selected from the 
whole field. 12 weeks credit. MR. SPRAU. 

103. Literary Material for the Grades. (Course 102 prere- 
quisite). The purpose of this course is to introduce the student- 
teacher to material which is adapted to his work in the training 
school or for later independent class-room experience. One 
hour is devoted daily to discussion and criticism; (1), of chap- 
ters in MacClintock's "Literature in the Elementary School"; 
(2), of literary material mentioned in MacClintock considered 
from the points of view of its fitness for children in school, 
and of its value as real literature. The second hour is given up 
to lectures on the principles of literary criticism and child 
study as related to literature; these lectures are supplemented 
by suggestions for guidance in reading and for the making of 
bibliographies. Required in Life and Grade School Courses. 
12 weeks credit. MISS KECK. 

109. English Literature. The aim of this course is to study 
some one poet. Shakespeare will be studied during the sum- 
mer term of 191 1. Several plays will be carefully studied and 
read in class; others will be assigned for supplementary read- 
ing. The plays that wil be studied are "King Henry IV", "As 
You Like It", and "Macbeth" or "Othello". 12 weeks credit. 

MR. SPRAU. 

114. Teachers' Course in Grammar. This course embraces 

(a) Rapid academic review of the subject. 

(b) Comparative study of texts, using Whitney's "Essentials 
of English Grammar" as a basis. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 21 

(c) Discussion of methods of teaching grammar in grades be- 
low the high school. 6 weeks credit. MISS KECK. 

EXPRESSION 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 
Review Courses. 
1. Reading and Orthography. A careful study will be 
made of "Reading in Public School" by Briggs and Coffman, 
one of the Reading Circle books. This book forms the basis for 
the county teachers' examinations in Reading in August and 
October. In Orthography a thorough study of Pattengill's Or- 
thography will be made. MISS ENSFIELD. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Reading. A study of the elements of vocal expres- 
sion; daily vocabulary drill; a discussion of the relation of read- 
ing to literature and the reading of classic selections. An ana- 
lysis of selections from the best literature and a study of their 
vocal interpretation. 12 weeks credit. MISS SHANWISE. 

103. Short Story Hour. This hour has as its aim instruc- 
tive recreation. The instructor will read short stories, essays, 
and poems from modern standard authors, thereby aiming to 
suggest a taste and appreciation of modern HteVature. 

MISS SHANEWISE. 

104. Extemporaneous Speaking. The aim of this course is 
to prepare students for logical, forceful, extemporaneous 
thought and expression. 6 weeks credit. MISS SHANEWISE. 

105. Shakespearean Reading. A study of the principles of 
dramatic structure; of plots, and of the characters; and the ap- 
plication of these principles to three Shakespearean dramas. Vo- 
cal interpretation of the greatest scenes will be studied. 12 
weeks credit. MISS SHANEWISE. 

Note. — Course 104 or 105 will be given according to elec- 
tions of students. 

GEOGRAPHY 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

Review Courses 

5. Review Geography. This review course is planned to 

prepare for the examinations in August and October. The topics 

announced by the Department of Public Instruction will be used 

as a basis for the work. MR. CARRICK. 



22 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101A. Meteorology and Climatology. In this course, 
which is an integral part of the work in general geography of- 
fered by the department, the chief emphasis is placed upon the 
distribution of those climatic elements that condition the dis- 
tribution of life on the earth. 6 weeks credit. MR. WOOD. 

101B. Geographic Geology. Study of the origin and dis- 
tribution of the various land forms of the earth surface. In this 
course the various relief forms are studied by means of topo- 
graphic maps and chalk modeling in connection with them. 
The course also includes a brief study >of the chief rocks and 
minerals. 6 weeks credit. MR. WOOD. 

102A. Principles of Geography. This course should follow 
course 101A and 101B, since the work consists of the studyof the 
distribution of life forms — in relation to climate and to the relief 
of the land. The study covers the more general life zones and 
regions of the earth. 6 weeks credit. MR. WOOD. 

102B. Regional Geography. A study of the leading nations 
of Europe and of North America in a comparative way, em- 
phasis being placed upon the commercial and industrial devel- 
opment. 6 weeks credit. MR. WOOD. 

Note. — These four courses cover the required work of the 
life course. Students of the graded school course desiring but 
one term of geography should take course 101A on Climate and 
course 102B on Regional Geography. 

103. Minerals and Rocks. This is a nature study course 
given partly in the laboratory and partly in the field. Excursions 
will be made either between 4: 10 and 6 o'clock or Saturday 
mornings. Students who plan to take this work should bring 
all the rocks and minerals that they may have at home. 
6 weeks credit. MR. WOOD. 

GERMAN 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

lor. Elementary Course. Twice daily. The aim of this 
course is to give the student a knowledge of the rudiments of 
German grammar and facility in reading and reproducing easy 

nan. A number of texts will hz rcacTand discussed in Ger- 
man. 12 weeks credit. MISS ZIMMERMAN. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 23 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

114. Advanced Course. The study, of some drama or prose 
narrative, to be selected to meet the needs of the class. A review 
of German grammar and syntax and practice in speaking and 
writing the language. 6 weeks credit. MISS ZIMMERMAN. 

115. Teacher's Course. This will be primarily a course in 
German conversation, especially designed for those who feel 
that their knowledge of the spoken language is inadequate for 
present day demands in modern language instruction. The work 
will consist of discussions of German texts in German and the 
writing of compositions and reproductions. 6 to 12 weeks credit. 

MISS ZIMMERMAN. 

HISTORY 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

7-8. English History. Elective in High School course. 
Special emphasis laid on the social and industrial development 
of England. 12 weeks credit. MISS WAKEMAN. 

12. General History. A review course for students ex- 
pecting to take the examination for second grade certificate. 
The class will meet twice daily. 12 weeks credit in High School 
course. MISS WAKEMAN. 

13. United States History. A review course to meet the 
needs of students preparing for the August and October exami- 
nations. Four sections will be formed and a credit of 12 weeks 
in the Rural School course may be earned. 

MR. HUNGERFORD. 

14. Civil Government. This course is planned primarily 
for students who wish to prepare for the August and October 
examinations. Four sections will be formed. Bring any text- 
books available. MR. CONKLING. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 
101-2. United States History. Emphasis will be laid upon 
the different periods according to the needs of the class. Special 
attention will be given to choice of subject matter and biblio- 
graphy suitable for grade work. 12 weeks credit. MR. HICKEY. 
106. The Nineteenth Century. A study of important his- 
torical developments in Europe. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. HICKEY. 



24 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

KINDERGARTEN 

The Kindergarten will be open the first four weeks for ob- 
servation and a limited number will be permitted to practice, 
p— ii a.m. No credits. MISS GAGE. 

GAMES AND RHYTHMS. 

Open to all Elementary teachers. Emphasis will be placed 
upon the psychological significance of this phase of play show- 
ing how certain elements are characteristic of games for young 
children as contrasted with those played by older children. Op- 
portunity will be given for original work in both rhythms and 
games. 8 a. m. MISS GAGE. 

LATIN 

REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

2. Latin and Composition. This course is designed for 
those who are preparing to teach Latin, and those who have 
taught but feel the need of added drill in writing Latin. 6 weeks 
credit. MISS ALLISON. 

4, 7, or io. Advanced Latin. Classes will be formed for 
those desiring work in Caesar, Cicero, or Virgil. These courses 
are designed for those who wish to continue the study of one of 
these authors "in absentia", and the aim will be to give the stu- 
dent an insight into the life of the author, the historical back- 
ground, and the method of study, which will enable him to con- 
tinue the work without a teacher. 6 to 12 weeks credit. 

MISS ALLISON. 
GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

108. Introduction to Latin. A course designed for those 
who have not had an opportunity to study Latin and do not ex- 
pect to pursue Latin authors in the original. The aim will be to 
teach Latin roots and phrases common in English as an aid to 
the student in the understanding of English literature. 12 weeks 
credit. MISS ALLISON. 

*LIBRARY METHODS FOR TEACHERS 

The courses in Library Methods for Teachers arranged by 
the State Board of Library Commissioners, will extend through 
the six weeks of the Summer School. Instruction will be given 
daily in the form of lectures and practical problems in connec- 
tion with the Commission's special library. 
*Subject to change. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 25 

101. Two courses will be given: one in the elementary 
methods of library administration, accession, classification, cata- 
loguing, etc. — given with the purpose of making it possible for 
the teacher in charge of the school library to care for it and use 
it in the most efficient way, rather than for the purpose of train- 
ing professional librarians. 6 weeks credit. MISS FRENCH. 

102. The second course will include more general work, — 
daily discussions of children's books taken from the selected 
library, use of lists and bibliographies, and one week each of 
lectures on Children's Reading and on Reference Books, given 
by specialists in these branches, sent by the Library Commis- 
sion. The purpose of the work is to acquaint teachers with the 
best and most helpful material and method for work supplemen- 
tary to the regular curriculum. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS FRENCH. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Manual Training. 101. Consist of hand work suitable for 
pupils of first four grades, and includes work with paper, card- 
board, string, raffia, clay, wood, and other materials. 12 weeks 
credit. MR. WAITE. 

Manual Training 102. Instruction in wood and other mater- 
ials suitable for the pupils in the fifth and sixth grades. 12 
weeks credit. MR. WAITE. 

Manual Training 103. Instruction in woodworking shops 
suitable for students of the seventh and eighth grades. Work 
in various kinds of wood, the use of woodworking tools of all 
kinds, and the finishing of the objects made. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. HUFF. 

Manual Training 104. (a) More advanced work in cabinet 
making and joinery, and elementary wood turning. 12 weeks 
credit. MR. HILL. 

Manual Training 105. Advanced wood turning, pattern 
making, molding and casting of patterns made. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. HILL 

Manual Trainnig 106. Forging exercises in drawing, upset- 
ting, twisting, welding, tempering of iron and steel; ornamental 
work in iron; chipping, filing and fitting metals; use of drill 
press and engine lathe. 12 weeks credit. MR. HILL. 

Manual Training 107-8. Economics of Manual Art. Devel- 
opment of manual training in the United States; organization of 



26 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

courses of study; planning of rooms and buildings; selection and 
purchase of tools and materials; supervision of manual training 
work; manual training and technical schools of England, Scot- 
land and Wales; lectures and discussions; topical reports. 
12 weeks credit. MR. WAITE. 

Manual Training 109. Mechanical Drawing. Consists of 
simple elementary and geometrical problems, the use of instru- 
ments, plans, and elevations of simple objects, and simple let- 
tering. 12 weeks credit. MR. HUFF. 

Manual Training no. Mechanical Drawing. Continuation 
of geometrical problems, more advanced drawings of objects, 
drawings of shop exercises, and lettering. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. HUFF. 

Manual Training in. Mechanical Drawing. Orthographic 
projections development of surfaces and sheet metal patterns, 
machine drawings. 12 weeks credit. MR. HUFF. 

Manual Training 112. Mechanical Drawing. Isometric 
drawings, mechanical shading and drawings, designs for equip- 
ment for woodworking rooms, tracings and blue prints. 
12 weeks credit. MR. HUFF. 

Manual Training 113. Mechanical Drawing. Mechanical 
shading of drawings including tinting in colors, plans of school- 
rooms showing equipments, designs for shop exercises, machine 
drawings. Plans, elevations, details, specifications, tracings and 
blue prints of a manual training building. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. HUFF. 

In the manual training courses instruction is given regard- 
ing materials and topical reports are required. In the classes, 
Ritchey's Manual Training and Economics of Manual Training, 
Rouilnon are used as text-books. Much reference work is done, 
all students having free access jto the library, which is well 
equipped. 

MATHEMATICS 

DR. F AUGHT. 
REVIEW, RURAL AND HIGH SCHOOL COURSES 

1. Rural School Arithmetic. This course reviews the 
entire field of grade arithmetic, giving especial attention to the 
needs of the rural schools. Much attention will be given to prob- 
lems bearing on farm and home life. In connection with the 
course, instruction will be given in grading pupils in arithmetic, 



SUMMER BULLETIN 27 

and that part of the State Manual bearing on this subject will 
be reviewed. 12 weeks credit. MR. JILLSON. 

7. Plane Geometry. Designed for those preparing for 
teacher's examination and those desiring a review of the sub- 
ject as a preparatory subject. Much attention is given to the 
methods of attack. MR. JILLSON. 

11. Advanced Algebra. This course will include a review 
of Fundamental Processes, Fractions and Simple Equations; 
Radicals and Exponents; Logarthims; Quadratic Equations; 
Graphs; Proportion, and Progressions. 12 weeks credit. 

MR. JILLSON. 

13. Arithmetic. A review for those desiring to prepare for 
teachers' examination. The topics anonunced by the State De- 
partment for the examinations in August and October will be 
emphasized. Four sections. MR. OTWELL. 

14. Algebra. Review course for those preparing for teach- 
ers' examination or for students who wish to review the sub- 
jects as a preparatory course. 

GRADED SCHOOL AND LIFE CERTIFICATE COURSES 

101. Arithmetic. A teacher's course. To elect this course 
the student should have a knowledge of geometry and of the 
beginners' course in psychology. The work consists of two 
parts, divided as follows: 

(a) A study of the origin of number and its use. The his- 
tory of the development of the subject matter of arithmetic, and 
past and present day methods of teaching the subject. Assigned 
readings and class room discussions form a prominent part of 
this work| 

(b) Review of some of the more difficult parts of arith- 
metic 12 weeks credit. DR. FAUGHT. 

102. College Algebra. Arithmetical and geometrical pro- 
gressions binomial theorem, development of functions in series, 
logarithms, theory of equations, convergency and divergency of 
series, permutations and combinations. 12 weeks credit. 

DR. FAUGHT. 

103. Plane Trigonometry. This is equivalent to the work 
done during the regular session. Solution of triangles by both 
natural and logarithmic functions. 12 weeks credit. 

DR. FAUGHT. 
Note. — Either 102 or 103 will be given, according to the 
number of students electing one course or the other. 



28 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

MUSIC 

ioi. Elements of Vocal Music. This is an academic 
course, and should precede the Teachers' Course in Music. It 
presupposes no previous knowledge, but deals with the very ru- 
diments of vocal music. It consists of the cultivation of the ear, 
the voice, and the beginning of sight singing. The course cov- 
ered is that of Book One of any of the standard music courses, 
and may be eliminated by examination. 12 weeks credit. 

MISS HOOTMAN. 

102. Elements of Vocal Music. This course must be pre- 
ceded by Course I or its equivalent. It consists of ear training, 
voice culture, melodic writing of a simple character, advanced 
sight singing, and practice in part singing. 12 weeks credit. 

MISS HOOTMAN. 

103. Voice Culture I. This course includes both concert 
and individual work. Correct breathing, proper placing of the 
voice, clarity of tone, articulation and enunciation will be treat- 
ed specifically. Some songs will be taken up for interpretation. 
This course is open to all students. Laboratory credit, 3 or 6 
weeks. MISS MARSH. 

MISS HOOTMAN. 

106. Teachers' Course in Music. This must be preceded 
course 101 or its equivalent. Advanced sight reading and ear 
training are taken up in this class, discussion of methods, and 
practice teaching during the class period as a preparation for 
teaching this subject in the first eight grades. Observation is 
made in the training school. 12 weeks credit. MISS MARSH. 

107. Primary Songs and Games. This course is a sug- 
gestive one for teachers in the primary grades as well as for 
specializing students. The following phases will be developed: 
Rhythm, — feeling for and interpretation of different rhythms 
through games, balls, percussion instruments, folk dances and 
rhythmic steps. Songs, — a sequence applicable to seasons and 
school festivals and taken from the best composers of children's 
songs will be learned. The care of the child voice and the pres- 
entation of these two phases to the child will also be taken up. 
Ability to play the rhythmic studies and accompaniments is de- 
sirabe and is required from specializing students in the kinder- 
garten and music courses. Observation may be made in the 
training school. 6 weeks credit. MISS MARSH. 



Q 





> 




SUMMER BULLETIN 29 

109. Harmony I. The work consists of ear training, and a 
study of construction of scales, intervals and chords. The writ- 
ing of simple original settings for songs, and the harmonizing 
of easy melodies. Students must have had Elements of Music I 
or its equivalent and be able to play chords, scales, and hymn 
tunes. 6 weeks credit. MISS MARSH. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

no. A course of plays and games. Arranged to meet the 
needs of the child at the various stages of development. Games 
for indoor and outdoor use. 6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

102. A course in Folk Dancing. Folk dancing has taken 
an important place in the physical education of the child. In 
this course will be given dances suitable for each grade. 
6 weeks credit. MISS JONES. 

Instruction in tennis and volley ball will be given each 
morning at 7: 10. 6 weeks credit. 

Instruction in swimming will be given in the mornings by 
appointment. The pool is open to the women mornings. 

DEPARTMENT OF RURAL SCHOOLS 

The aim of this department is to fit teachers for efficient 
service in rural schools. An increasing number of rural districts 
are demanding trained teachers, and these districts are accom- 
panying this demand with an increase in the wages offered. 
Teachers of rural schools can show their appreciation of these 
improving conditions and their honesty of purpose in meeting 
these conditions in no better way than by accepting every offered 
opportunity for improving the character of their services to the 
districts. 

The county commissioners of southwestern Michigan who 
cooperated so heartily in the work last year are most cordially 
urged to spend as much time as possible in Kalamazoo during 
the weeks between June 26 and August 4. During the term there 
will be a series of conferences of commissioners to consider 
questions pertaining to the welfare of rural schools. Some one 
of the County School Commissioners present will lead in these 
discussions. On enrollment day each Commissioner present will 
have a place in which to confer with the teachers from his 
county, and all the term after 3:20 o'clock p.m. room 13 (the 
first room north of the assembly room on the second floor of 



3 o WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

the Normal building) will be at the disposal of any Commissioner 
who wishes to call the teachers of his county together for social 
or other purpose. In this room will be found exhibits of actual 
and suggested rural school work. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

In addition to the academic, review, and methods courses 
offered in the several departments, three courses will be given 
in the Rural School Department which will be planned for the 
specific purposes of putting the teachers of rural schools on 
terms of close familiarity with the applied problems of organi- 
zation, classification, and management of these schools; and the 
course of study, school laws, and community and industrial con- 
ditions by which their work is governed. 

i. School Management and Law. It will be the aim of this 
course to make as thorough a study as time will permit of the 
State Course of Study for rural schools, the General School 
Laws and School Management. Students owning McMurry's 
"How to Study and Teaching How to Study", and text-books 
in school management should bring them. The work will be 
supplemented by library references and incidental illustrations 
from the daily work of rural schools. The exhibits of actual 
rural school work from the counties and from the Normal's 
Rural Observation School will be closely studied. This course 
will directly aid all who are preparing for the August county 
teachers' examination, in three regular examination topics: 
Theory and Art, Course of Study, and School Law. As many 
sections will be organized as the enrollment makes advisable. 
All who complete this course will be given 6 weeks credit in the 
regular Rural School Course. MR. BURNHAM. 

MR. PHELAN. 

2. Rural Social Service. A directed course in reading in 
Rural Social Service will be amplified by discussion for the pur- 
pose of calling the attention of teachers to the great possibil- 
ities in rural social life and inspiring them to take part intelli- 
gently in local activities, which make for rural progress. All who 
complete this work will be given 6 weeks credit in the regular 
Rural School Course. MR. BURNHAM. 

3. Agriculture. This course aims to give the student a 
general conception of the possibilities of the various phases of 
agriculture in the rural school. 



SUMMER BULLETIN 31 

This will include the use of a text-book, lectures, visits to 
neighboring farms and creameries and experimental work in the 
School Garden. Four hours a week. 6 weeks credit. 

MISS KOCH. 

TEACHING 

101. General Methods. (1) A study of the elementary 
school curriculum v/ith consideration of the subject matter best 
suited to the interests, and needs of each period of childhood. 
(2) The problem of motivation of school work. (3) A discus- 
sion of types of lessons and the making of lesson plans. (4) Sys- 
tematic observation of different phases of grade work in the 
training school, with reports and class discussion. 12 weeks 
credit. MISS DENSMORE. 

107. Graded Primary Methods. (1) Study of interests and 
activities of primary children. (2) Consideration of material of 
different subjects best adapted for development or inhibition 
of these activities. (3) Discussion of methods of handling 
materials. (4) At least one-half hour daily of observation in 
the training school, with reports and class discussion. 6 weeks 
credit. MISS DENSMORE. 

7. Rural School Methods. The preceding course will be 
given in two sections one for graded school, the other for rural 
school teachers. In the latter course special problems of the 
rural school will be considered and emphasis will be given to 
the construction work and seat work possible in rural schools. 
At least one-half hour daily of observation in the training school 
is required. 6 weeks credit. MISS ENSFIELD. 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

In addition to the kindergarten, the first, fourth, and sixth 
grades of the training school will be in session from 9 to 11 
a. m. each day for four weeks of the summer term, to accommo- 
date those who wish to observe teaching in the grades. The 
regular critic teachers will have charge of this work, with the co- 
operation of the special teachers in drawing, music, manual 
training, physical training, domestic art, and domestic science. 
The work will aim to present proper material for use in the 
various subjects of the curriculum, such as nature study, ge- 
ography, reading and language, and the special branches, in- 
cluding handwork, as well as to show good methods of teach- 
ing. 



32 WESTERN STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

It is hoped that large numbers of the students will avail 
themselves of the help thus afforded them. No Normal School 
credit is offered for this work. Commissioners may arrange with 
the director, however, for reports of attendance of their teach- 
ers. Observation will be required in connection with the courses 
in Graded Primary and Rural School Methods. Each critic will 
reserve the 11:20 hour for conference and general discussion 
with the observers in the grade. 

MISS DENSMORE and CRITIC TEACHERS. 



:t\m& I m '■■ ' '■ ■ ' \\ ;